best performance snow sled

The 10 Best Snow Sleds Reviewed for 2017/2018

Your options for sleds to buy are endless, and range from adult-only serious sporting equipment, to inflatable kids sleds with cartoon imprints. No matter what type of winter sled you go with, it’s a sure way to keep you from hibernating the winter months away.

So, sledding is a sport that everyone can do, is relatively safe, cost-effective, and can be performed solo or with a group. That’s great – but what sled should you buy?

Because we believe the best purchases come from educated decisions, we’ve put together a review of the best sleds for adults, the best sleds for kids, and the best sleds for toddlers (parent supervision required).

We’ve also developed a buyer’s guide to help you methodically pick out the best snow slider for you and your family. Enjoy the ride!

Quick Answer: The 10 Best Snow Sleds Reviewed for 2017/2018:

  1. Yukon Charlies Hammerhead Pro XLD Sled
  2. KL Industries Terrain Sport Sled
  3. Flexible Flyer Snow Screamer
  4. Zipfy Two Tone Series/Freestyle Luge Snow Sled
  5. GoFloats Winter Snow Tube
  6. Lucky Bums Kids Toboggan Sled
  7. Flexible Flyer Steel Saucer
  8. Pelican Baby Sleigh
  9. Paricon Toddler Boggan Sled
  10. Kiddie Snow Seal Pull Sled – 33”

Best Snow Sleds

 Best Sled for AdultsBest Sled for KidsBest Sled for Toddlers
Yukon Charlies Hammerhead Pro XLD SledFlexible Flyer Snow ScreamerPelican Baby Sleigh
editors choice
Type / ConstructionHi-tech aluminum frame and polycarbonate skisDurable lightweight foam constructionHardwood frame and durable HDPE polymer runners
Weight15 lbs.4.2 lbs.6.7 lbs.
Customer Ratings4.4 out of 5 Stars4.1 out of 5 stars4.2 out of 5 stars

Snow Sled Reviews

The Best Sleds for Adults

#1 Yukon Charlies Hammerhead Pro XLD Sled

 

This might be the best sled for adults who are serious about this sport. You can take it out in any snow weather: light powder, compact snow, or icy grounds, and you will fly. This sled is more like a serious piece of sports equipment than a casual winter toy.

The concave design of the front runners and the guides on the rear runners prevent the sled from going sideways, and the patented “g-steering” provides quick and accurate control.

Features of the Yukon Charlies Hammerhead Pro Sled:

  • Dimensions: 7 x 22.5 x 51 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 10 pounds
  • Material: Powder coated 6063 aluminum frame; polycarbonate front skis; hdpe rear skis; rubber ski boots; stainless steel leaf spring steering with rubber grips
  • Age Range: 13 years old and up
  • Weight Restrictions: Weight cannot exceed 200 pounds

The tech mesh body of the sleigh absorbs bumps and shocks, so you won’t be sore the next day, like some other winter sleds. It’s a great option for adults with a history of spine or lower back problems.

As always, we strongly encourage following the safety guidelines a product comes with. This sled, proclaimed as “your grandpa’s sled on steroids” recommends a helmet at all times.

Buyer FYI:

The earlier version of this sled was recalled back in June 2016 due to safety reasons. The manufacturer has since made modifications and the recall has been lifted.

Although this might discourage some consumers, we think this is probably one of the safer sleds now, due to the extra concern and attention paid to the engineering and manufacturing of the product.

#2 KL Industries Terrain Sport Sled

For adults who value versatility, the KL Industries Terrain Sports Sled can be used for cruising snow hills with your family and friends, or hauling logs for the fire on an ATV. It’s built tough and handles harsh elements with ease.

Features of the KL Industries Terrain Sports Sled:

  • Dimensions: 54 x 26 x 9.5 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 11.5 pounds
  • Material: Strong, durable plastic
  • Age Range: 5 years old and up
  • Weight Restrictions: None specified by the manufacturer; we recommend no more than 200 pounds

It’s the perfect combination of work and play. You certainly won’t feel guilty purchasing this; after you enjoy sledding with your kids, you can put this sled to work in every season (it handles grass just as well as it handles snow).

The Best Sleds for Kids

#3 Flexible Flyer Snow Screamer

 

The slick bottom surface on this foam snow sled allows your child to rocket down snowy hills! Don’t worry – there are four durable handles for your kid to grip on to as they enjoy the smooth ride.

Features of the Flexible Flyer Snow Screamer:

  • Dimensions: 7 inches long by 21.5 inches wide
  • Weight: 3 pounds
  • Material: Lightweight foam
  • Age Range: 5 years old up to 12 years old
  • Weight Restrictions: Weight should not exceed 120 pounds

This is a great sled if your child enjoys sharing their snow toys. Two children can fit comfortably and safely, but be warned: the more weight on the sleigh, the slower it will move. For this reason, we recommend this Flexible Flyer sled for ages 5 – 12 (depending on how quickly your child grows!).

#4 Zipfy Two Tone Series/Freestyle Luge Snow Sled

Be careful buying this for your child – it glides so smoothly and steers easier than any other sled we’ve reviewed! With a maximum weight capacity of 250 pounds, you might find yourself borrowing your child’s toy more often than they would like…

Features of the Zipfy Luge Snow Sled:

  • Dimensions: 15.98 x 12.99 x 20.98 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 3.5 pounds
  • Material: HDPE Plastic
  • Age Range: 4 years old up to adults
  • Weight Restrictions: Maximum weight capacity of 250 pounds

Zipfy engineers their sleds to be used for all ages. We suggest buying two and having a good old fashioned sled race! Simply maneuver hills by leaning into the side; when you are ready to stop, drop your heels.

#5 GoFloats Winter Snow Tube

Searching for a way to make snow tubing even more fun for your child? How about a snow tube that looks like a polar bear, penguin, flamingo, or unicorn? Let your child select their favorite character – you can’t go wrong!

Features of the GoFloats Winter Snow Tube:

  • Dimensions: 4 ft wide by 3 ft tall
  • Weight: 5-6 pounds, depending on the character
  • Material: Cold-weather treated durable plastic
  • Age Range: 5 years old up to adult
  • Weight Restrictions: Weight cannot exceed 200 pounds

This snow tube is strong and dependable, and works exactly like it should. It’s quick to get on the hills too – just inflate the rapid inflation valve with an air pump, like one you use for air mattresses.

#6 Lucky Bums Kids Toboggan Sled

 

This classic toboggan has built-in grip handles and a handy pull rope so your child can tow it around with ease. It’s a simple style that delivers speed and snow fun!

Features of the Lucky Bums Kids Toboggan Sled:

  • Dimensions: 35 x 18 x 5 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 2.1 pounds
  • Material: Hard, durable plastic
  • Age Range: 4 years old and up
  • Weight Restrictions: Weight should not exceed 220 pounds

Measuring 35 inches long and holding up to 220 pounds, you can get in on the fun and double up with your child on their sled ride. That is, if they let you!

#7 Flexible Flyer Steel Saucer

Who doesn’t enjoy the thrill of whipping down a mountain in their own personal saucer sled? We put this sled in the children’s category because it is recommended for ages 5 and up, but really, it is a great snow saucer for adults, too.

Features of the Flexible Flyer Steel Saucer:

  • Dimensions: 4 x 26 x 26 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 7.1 pounds
  • Material: Steel saucer; rope handles
  • Age Range: 5 years old and up
  • Weight Restrictions: None specified by the manufacturer; we recommend no more than 160 pounds

 This saucer will last you for years, thanks to the hard-wearing steel it is made of. We aren’t completely sure what is on the bottom of the saucer, but whatever it is, it makes you go lightning fast!

The Best Sleds for Toddlers

#8 Pelican Baby Sleigh

In a hurry to take your toddler out for their first snow day adventure? The Pelican Baby Sleigh comes completely assembled, (tow rope included!) so you don’t have to waste precious hours building it.

Features of the Pelican Baby Sleigh:

  • Dimensions: 14.5 x 11.25 x 30 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 6.7 pounds
  • Material: Wood, HDPE polymer runners
  • Age Range: Babies to toddlers
  • Weight Restrictions: Weight should not exceed 45 pounds

The classic look will quickly bring you back to your childhood snow day memories. It glides smoothly, and is nice and light for you (or your wee one) to carry up snow hills.

This wooden sled is ideal for one child who can hold their head up and can sit upright with only lower back support. It’s a sturdy sleigh, but does not have a safety strap – our biggest qualm with this product.

#9 Paricon Toddler Boggan Sled

This is a great safety-first baby sled. It has a high back for support, a fastened safety belt to keep your young one in place, and glides easily with a secure tow rope. The plastic is durable, and the seat offers your child comfort while they enjoy their snow ride.

Features of the Paricon Toddler Boggan Sled:

  • Dimensions: 15.5 by 12 by 27 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 3 pounds
  • Material: Durable plastic
  • Age Range: 18 months up to 3 years old
  • Weight Restrictions: Weight should not exceed 40 pounds

We recommend this baby snow sled for only a few inches of snow, snow that is packed tightly, or ice landscapes. We found this sled can begin to sink if there is more than 12” of powdery snow.

#10 Kiddie Snow Seal Pull Sled – 33”

In our opinion, this is the best sled for toddlers. The seal character will entertain your child whether they are on or off it, and since it’s inflatable you can literally pack this sled up and take it with you anywhere.

Features of the Kiddie Snow Seal Pull Sled:

  • Dimensions: 10 x 5.8 x 3.5 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Material: Inflatable plastic
  • Age Range: 1 – 4 years old
  • Weight Restrictions: None specified by manufacturer; we recommend no more than 45 pounds

The air cushions keep your child comfortable, while you have the benefit of a lightweight sled. The pull rope is very sturdy, and overall, it glides seamless over almost all types of snow.

Our only issue is the lack of safety belt. The air cushions seem to hug most children tight, but what parent doesn’t appreciate the extra peace of mind of a safety belt?!

How to Select the Best Sled for Snow

 Winter is on its way, and you don’t need to pick up speed skating or compete in luge to get the most of a snow day.

Sledding has been around since humans have dwelt in cold, snowy environments. Although snow sleighs and sleds developed out of necessity – to effectively haul food, wood, and materials for shelter across terrain – they have evolved into recreational devices that everyone can enjoy, no skills necessary!

As you can see, there are quite a few different sled styles on the market. Before you decide to purchase a sled, you should be familiar with all your options.

Types of Sleds:

The Snow Tube – These inflatable personal-sized tubes are typically made of tough plastic, and whip down snow fast. Most have some sort of hand grip, but be warned – tubes are comfortable, but don’t allow you to brake easy!

If you must pack and travel to get to your snowy destination, snow tubes are a great option, due to their lightweight and ability to inflate with a simple air pump.

When looking to purchase one of these, you’ll want to make sure your tube comes with a repair kit to patch holes.

The Toboggan – The most classic style of winter sled, toboggans are lightweight, long, narrow, and curve upward at the back and front. They can be made from wood, plastics, or a range of other materials. If you are looking for a sled to fit you and your kids on, you want a nice, long toboggan.

The Saucer Sled – Similar to a snow tube, saucers are circular, come with grips, and are meant for single-person use. That’s where the similarities end, however.

Saucers are typically made of steel or other metal materials that glide quickly over snow. They are durable and long-lasting, but don’t try to pack this type of sled to bring on your winter vacation – they tend to be the heaviest type!

The Foam Snow Sled – Foam sleds are great for children because they are so soft and lightweight. They come in a range of shapes and sizes, and (don’t tell your children) they don’t go lightning fast. They are a great option for keeping your dare-devil under control.

Sleds That Steer – If you’re the type that likes control (or prefers to maneuver around trees instead of hitting them), you’ll want a sled with steering capability.

Some high-end versions have their own steering wheels – but those can cost a pretty penny. Most sleds (expect for snow tubes) have some maneuverability, but others are better at steering and breaking.

Zipfy makes a range of sleds for both kids and adults, that offer an incredible amount of control. Keep in mind these are single-sized – so you’ll have to get a sled for everyone in your family!

Now that you know the range of sled types out there, you can start narrowing in on your needs. Make sure you ask yourself the following questions.

What Features Does Your “Best Sled” Need?

  1. Will your sled be for single-person or multiple-person use?If you are a parent, then don’t even think about getting a snow tube or saucer sled – you’ll want to get a longer snow toy that can fit your whole crew. Toboggans and foam sleds are the best.
  2. Do you plan on using your sled for years to come, or only one season?This will largely dictate how much money you should spend. If you just want a fun sled for one season, it’s okay to buy a cheaper snow sled. If you want this sled to last for several years, then you should invest more money.
  3. How important is speed to you?If you want to fly like the wind, look for sleds that are lightweight and have a slick bottom. Steel and plastic are generally the best materials to glide over snow.
  4. How important is safety to you?Especially if you are purchasing a sled for your toddler or child, you should consider safety. You want a sled that won’t break apart during use, and will keep your child upright and in the sleigh as opposed to on the cold, hard ground.Some toddler sleds come with safety belts, but so long as your baby is tucked snuggly in the sled, they should be fine while you tow them. Make sure your sled has a strong tow rope.
  5. Do you intend to workout with your sled?

Yes, this is a serious question. If you haven’t caught on yet, sled pulls are a serious new workout, regardless of the season.

Typically, this workout is done with indoor sled equipment, but during the winter season, you can load up a sturdy sled with logs and get your exercise in the great outdoors.

If you plan on using a sled for this purpose, make sure it is made of highly durable material and comes with a strong tow rope (preferably made of real rope, and not plastic).

You’ll need a sled that can carry the weight you want to pull, plus be able to take the resistance of you tugging at the tow rope.

 Staying Safe While Sledding

Sledding is a great way to spend the day with your kids and family, but you need to remember that frostbite, hypothermia, and head wounds are a real possibility if you don’t take the time to consider sledding safety.

We recommend the following safety tips:

  • Only sled during the day, or on grounds that are fully lit up at night.
    Visibility is a huge concern with sledding. Plus, if you get into an accident or verve off course, it’s much harder to find your way back at night – and it’s colder out, increasing your chances of frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Sled on hills that don’t end on a street or parking lot. Sledding is fun because you get to zip around so quickly – but that means it can be hard to brake when obstacles (like cars) are heading your way. Pick hills that have lots of open space at the end of the course.
  • Spot check before you sled. Look around for potential hazards, like trees, fences, frozen or unfrozen ponds, icy areas, and other potentially dangerous elements. If you can stay on course away from these hazards, you should be fine. If you can’t, find a new hill.
  • Beware of ice! Ice is the worst hazard. If you hit your head on it, it can cause a concussion; if you slid onto it, it can break and you can end up in bone-chilling water. Stay away from ice!
  • Regardless if you are a child or an adult, make sure someone knows where you a sledding. Like any activity, when you go out alone, make sure at least one person close to you knows what you are doing and where you will be. You will be thankful if you get into an accident and need help!
  • Consider a helmet. Okay, they don’t look super cool. But, they can save lives (literally).
  • Buckle your baby up. If you are taking your baby out on a sled ride, make sure the towing cord is attached properly, they are bundled up and supported, and if your sled has a safety belt, they are buckled in.
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About El Tigre

Richard M. aka El Tigre is an avid adventure traveler with extensive trekking experience throughout Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean. In 1998 he weathered category 5 Hurricane Mitch on the northern coast of Honduras. He has mountain-biked, hiked and 4x4 toured extensively in Central America, Puerto Rico, Cuba and Mexico. In the summer of 2004 he lived among the Kuna Indians of the San Blas islands in Panama. Today, he manages a real estate investments company based in San Jose, Costa Rica and organizes adventure travel excursions to Costa Rica. He is a motorcycle enthusiast and enjoys sport touring and dual-sport riding. Richard lives in Arizona.