The 3 Best Snowshoes – 2016

Just because its winter doesn’t mean you should give up hiking or trail running. I think snowshoeing is a better best snowshoesworkout and there is something about being in the woods in the winter that is hard to describe.

You probably already have the winter apparel, now you just need a pair of snowshoes and you don’t need to spend a lot of money to to get a decent pair.

But how do you know which ones are right for you? There are quite few to choose from.

To find out we tested some of the popular brands in the Michigan Upper Peninsula in some pretty deep snow to see which ones would come out on top.

These are our favorite snowshoes, as they won our trust because of their superior performance.

  1. MSR EVO 22 Snowshoe
  2. Chinook Trekker Snowshoes
  3. MTN All Terrain Snowshoes

Here is an overview of the snowshoes with full reviews and our buying guide below.

The 3 Best Snowshoes

Mobile Users Scroll Over =>Chinook Trekker SnowshoesMSR Evo 22 SnowshoeMTN All Terrian Snowshoes
editors choice
Sizes Available:19, 22, 25, 30, 36 Inches22-Inch (optional Tails available) 22, 25, 27, 30 Inches
Weight of Shoe: ~ 3.91 pounds / 1.77 kg~ 3 lbs 9 oz / 1.63 kg~ 3 lbs 5 oz / 1.5 kg
Weight Capacity:19 inch 90 pounds / 41 kg and up to 300 pounds / 136 kg for 36 inchUp to 180 lbs / 80 kilos
with optional tails: 250 lbs/ 114 kg
22 inch 160 lbs and up to 250 pounds for 30 inch

Snowshoe Reviews

#1 MSR EVO 22 Snowshoe Review

MSR, a highly reputable brand owned by Cascade Designs is probably best known for their camping gear. They have in the case of the Evo snowshoes have created some of the best snowshoes on the market at any price.

Immediately inspiring confidence we learn that the traction components are made of steel and, what’s more, they’re molded directly into the body of the snowshoe – this leaves little room for components to fail.

MSR EVO 22 Snowshoe Review

MSR EVO 22 Snowshoe

A very simple aluminum and rubber non-moving-parts binding system says to me that MSR intended to mechanically simplify this snowshoe to increase user experience and decrease potential broken parts.

Modular and adjustable tails for these snowshoes mean adjustability when the snow gets deep and I think it’s a feature which greatly improved the value of the snowshoe as a whole. In my opinion with the tails put on,  these are best snowshoes for backcountry use.

However, the tails are not included and need to be purchased separately.

For a bargain price I think MSR has created a snowshoe that I can recommend without hesitation when compared to its higher priced peers.

#2 Chinook Trekker Snowshoes Review

For a budget minded traveler the Chinook snowshoes aren’t a bad choice. Featuring plastic decking and full rotation bindings, these snowshoes are middle of the road. Aluminum frame is lightweight and durable but not top of the line.

With aluminum crampons the durability won’t be world-class but it’s a long shot better than plastic teeth on your crampons. Don’t traverse a bunch of rock or you’ll have worn out crampons in no time.

Chinook Trekker Snowshoes Review

Chinook Trekker Snowshoes

The heel spikes on the crampons certainly come in handy for downhill travel.

Even at such a bargain price they included carrying bag which is a nice feature although far from a deciding factor in my mind.

I generally would say that even at such a bargain price you can have confidence in this entry-priced pair of snowshoes. These are probably the best snowshoes for the money.

#3 MTN All Terrain Snowshoes

Despite the fact that the MTN All Terain snowshoes comes with an included pair of hiking poles I am actually going to mark that as a negative. As a long time outdoor professional I know that a huge majority of outdoor enthusiasts already own a pair of poles which are probably higher quality, lighter weight, and more well suited to the individual.

Now if you don’t already have a pair then this will save you some money. The poles are pretty good and fully adjustable.

Pay attention to choosing the right size when you commit to this snowshoe as they seem to be offered in sporadic intervals. Double check with the manufacturer that you’re getting the right size.

MTN All Terrain Snowshoes Review

MTN All Terrain Snowshoes

I have to admit that my confidence was not inspired by the quickly assembled look or large use of aluminum and plastic components which are more common in lower end snowshoes.

I’d really like to see more attention to the rivets used to secure the decking to frame. However even after several seasons of use, they still are holding up just fine.

Like most budget minded outdoor I don’t like paying more for gear than I have to but I think you get what you pay for here. Though there’s a chance your snowshoes will last indefinitely I’d be prepared for repairs over time.

How To Choose Snowshoes

best snowshoe reviews

When I bought my first pair of snowshoes, I found a used pair on the cheap from the local Craigslist scene. I took them out in the first snowstorm we had and they summarily broke within minutes. Somehow I convinced the guy to give me my money back for his crappy old snowshoes but the point was clear – I had no idea what I was buying.

Learning what makes a pair of snowshoes a good choice for your needs is critical in avoiding dumb purchasing decisions like mine. While seemingly a simple tool, snowshoes warrant a fair amount of understanding and consideration in purchasing.

Let’s take a look at some of the most critical criteria for evaluating a snowshoe purchase and why to bother buying a pair in the first place!

Why You May Need Snowshoes

Traveling during snowy weather really leaves you two main options (unless you have a dog sled). You can ski or snowshoe. Each of these traveling methods is a topic unto its own but for not we’ll just highlight some benefits of each:


  • Faster on flat sections and downhills
  • Sometimes floats better in soft or deep snow
  • Skis can be used to create your shelter


  • Easier to traverse densely cluttered areas
  • Easier on uphill travel
  • Can traverse ice more readily

If you’re not going to use snowshoes or skis, you’re really left with boot packing it in the snow which is no fun at all and leads to sore, tired legs and wet, frustrated people.

Snowshoes are really not needed outside of knee deep snow conditions. Short travel in snow ankle deep is easier done in good boots. Once the snow piles up to mid-calf or knee deep then you’d better have a pair of snowshoes!


You’ll want to pair a good set of snowshoes with a nice pair of winter boots or hiking boots. I would recommend finding your winter travel footwear first and then choosing a snowshoe to be certain the snowshoe will fit your boot appropriately.

Hiking Boots

I hate hiking boots, they have many serious drawbacks for real hiking but they might just hit their stride for winter snowshoeing. You’ll have to decide how important waterproof boots are to you and where you’re going. For winter snowshoeing I would say waterproof boots are definitely a worth consideration.

Winter Snow Boots

The majority of “winter boots” are really not made in a way which is conducive to backcountry travel. Often the liners are absurdly thick and warm and not removable. This means once they get wet with sweat, they’ll stay that way.

This type of footwear is also just notorious for poor quality and fashion over function. Be selective here.

Mountaineering Boots

If you need mountaineering boots, you’ll probably already know it by now. The casual outdoor enthusiast does not need mountaineering boots. If you’re planning a trip up Denali, you might consider it. If you’re planning a trip to the local resort, you definitely don’t need them.

What to Look for in Snowshoes

Snowshoes come in several flavors but we’re going to keep it narrowed down to two main flavors:

  • Recreational & Budget
  • Backcountry Travel

There are many considerations to be made when choosing from among these two categories and once you’ve decided whether you’re a hardcore backcountry snowshoer or a weekend warrior, you’ll be ready to start looking at the following factors which affect snowshoe performance.


Not only do snowshoes need to help you float above the snow, they must also help you grip slick and sometimes icy surfaces.

During certain snow conditions a hard and thick layer of ice can form on the surface of the snow (known as “crust”). This layer can often support body weight and if your snowshoes don’t have some manner of traction on the bottom, you’ll be sliding around like Bambi on the pond.

Traction methods usually involve jagged metal teeth under the foot area of the snowshoe or (sometimes both) along the outer edge of the snowshoe frame. Carefully assess the likelihood of your need for traction when traveling with snowshoes before deciding what is right for you.

The more aggressive and steep the terrain you’ll be traveling as well as the likelihood of needing ice traction will determine your level of need for traction components and crampon type systems. In mountaineering type settings you may need some advanced level traction systems.

Watch out for traction systems featuring plastic components or plastic teeth. These weaker materials are guaranteed to fail.

Harness Attachment and Bindings

Snowshoes have to attach to your boots somehow. This is usually a system of straps and buckles which wrap over your boot and keep the snowshoe stuck fast against your foot. These systems can be fickle at times and often feature weak plastic components when buying budget-category snowshoes.

Bindings which feature a ratchet-style closure offer the best fitment and security in our opinion and we suggest you seek these whenever possible.

It is worth noting that some snowshoe bindings allow the snowshoe to rotate freely and limitless. These are full rotation bindings and may cause extra drag by allowing the tail of the snowshoe to drag along the snow behind you with each step.

The other type of binding is slightly more efficient and is called a fixed rotation binding – that is the snowshoe is held fast by the binding after a certain point and won’t be able to drag along behind you when you pick your foot up past a certain level.

Generally speaking fixed rotation bindings are a solid choice for the every day snowshoe enthusiast.

Testing Your Bindings

Remember to use the boots you’ll be traveling in when testing snowshoes. Try getting in and out of your snowshoes with gloves on and operate the binding systems to see how easy they are to use.

Test how snugly the binding fits your boot by checking for lateral and fore-aft slipping.

If you’re sensing a hot spot or pressure point where the straps of the bindings pinch your foot, that’s absolutely a no-go – you must solve this problem before traveling or you will pay the price with blisters.

Heel Lift

Much like backcountry ski bindings, some snowshoes feature a heel lift which can be adjusted to the angle of the slope which you are climbing. If you’re going to be climbing with your snowshoes this is recommended as it allows your foot to stay more level as the slope becomes increasingly aggressive.

For flat land walking, a heel lift is not really necessary.


The float offered by a snowshoe is measured by the surface area of the decking (the part underfoot which presses against the snow). More decking and a bigger snowshoe means more float. This is important if you are heavy, tall, or entering areas with deeper or softer snow.

Some snowshoe offer clip-on style additions which increase overall snow contact surface area and boost floatation. Consider a modular system like this if you expect to enter varying snow conditions and deep powder frequently.

Properly Sizing a Snowshoe

Sizing is really all about surface area versus weight. While we will talk about a few other considerations, this is really the deciding factor.

The heavier you are, the more surface area you will need in your snowshoe to distribute your weight so you don’t sink in the snow. This is pretty basic physics.

Here are some factors which might influence your overall weight:

  • How big are you as a person?
  • Are you carrying a pack?
  • How much gear are you carrying with you?

The inverse is worth considering – that is the more dense or packed down the snow is, the less floatation you’ll need for a given weight.

Every snowshoe manufacturer should have a sizing guide on their products. Simply refer to this sizing guide and don’t forget to include the weight of your gear and pack in your calculations.


Snowshoes can often be found in gender variations. This is not a sales gimmick – there’s really a difference.

Probably the most important difference is hip width and stride dynamics. Men and women are just built differently and this affects our stance and stride. Be sure to take into consideration your needs when choosing a snowshoe as it may be prudent to purchase a gender-specific snowshoe.

Hiking Poles

Absolutely a necessity in my book, hiking poles are critical to enjoying snowshoeing.

PRO TIP: Make sure your hiking poles feature a powder basket for snow. Powder baskets are larger and spread out the force of your hiking pole across the snow, in much the same manner as your snowshoe, thus preventing you from plunging your hiking pole uselessly into the snow.

Avoid the gimmicky cheap three-piece rotation lock hiking poles. They’re heavier than packing the kitchen sink. Look for fixed length hiking poles with a powder basket option and save yourself some problems.


You’ll get what you pay for with snowshoes and the overabundance of plastic components and cheap quality aluminum construction in many budget snowshoes lacks confidence. I would recommend the MSR EVO 22 without a doubt for its quality and reputation.

Don’t forget to do your research and shop around before committing to the best snowshoe option for you. Seek a shoe which is comfortable, sized appropriately, and ready to meet your needs.

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Just because its winter doesn't mean you should give up hiking or trail running. I think snowshoeing is a better workout and there is something about being in the woods in the winter that is hard to describe. You probably already have the winter apparel, now you just need a pair of snowshoes and you don't need to spend a lot of money to to get a decent pair. But how do you know which ones are right for you? There are quite few to choose from. To find out we tested some of the popular brands in the Michigan…

Review Overview


Summary : Our favorite snowshoe overall was the MSR Evo 22 Snowshoe. It was a great combination of traction, bindings and value.

About Casey Fielder

I am an avid outdoorsman with experience in naturalist education, outside adventure education, ski instruction, and writing. In addition to my outdoor hobbies, I’m a huge fan of punk rock. I have launched several start-ups. (or business ventures) When exploring the backcountry, I usually carry less than 10 pounds of gear. Years of experience have taught me to pack light. If you enjoy my writing, please check out my other material at I enjoy sharing my experiences of backcountry education teaching and guiding through writing.